McGILL BIRD OBSERVATORY

SUMMER BIRD MONITORING PROGRAM

June 6 - 30, 2008

Welcome to the McGill Bird Observatory weekly report.  Click here for a complete listing of our archives.
Comments or questions are welcome at "mbo AT migrationresearch.org".

PICTURE OF THE WEEK:



Operations were scaled back for summer as usual, to allow time for other projects and
to provide 'our' birds with a nice quiet place to rear their young. These little guys were
some of the few we banded once they were ready to head out into the world.
(Photo by Marie-Anne Hudson)

 

-

 

THIS MONTH

THIS SUMMER

2007 TOTAL

SITE TOTAL

# birds (and species) banded

10 (1)

10 (1)

838 (64)

13816 (105)

# birds (and species) repeat

--

--

198 (25)

2424 (60)

# birds (and species) return

--

--

92 (17)

423 (30)

# species observed

50

50

139

194

# net hours

0

0

2921.2

24858.0

# birds banded / 100 net hours

n/a

n/a

28.4

55.5

Note: table does not include nocturnal banding (owls)

Bander-in-charge:  Marie-Anne Hudson
Assistants: 
Gay Gruner, Barbara MacDuff, Sarah Marteinson, Chris Murphy

Notes:  June’s first census was the 6th, the first official day of our summer season. It picked up a lone Blackpoll Warbler, surely winging its way as fast as it could towards its breeding grounds. The censuses have been going about once or twice a week thanks to our hardy censusers (please see above). The average number of species seen during each visit (five in June) ranged between 29 and 36, however the total number of species observed during the month of June was 50, down from 60 in 2007.

Most of the birds that remained at MBO have settled down to breed, concentrating on raising a brood rather than singing. Most noticeably, the Common Yellowthroats have gone quiet, opting instead to skulk around the bushes and ‘cheack’ at you as you walk by.  So far we’ve had young Canada Geese, Black-capped Chickadee, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Swamp Sparrow.  We’re eager to see what July brings!


While this photo is a little less than interesting, what Sarah is pointing to (see her shadow?) is a patch of disturbed gravel that we suspect is sheltering another Snapping Turtle nest.  Those of you with good memories will remember we had roughly 30 young ones come clambering out last September, much to the delight over everyone on site.  We’re hoping the same will happen this time around!
(Photo by Marie-Anne Hudson)

 

The list of birds banded this month is comprised almost entirely of almost-fledged juveniles, with the exception of one after-hatch year Tree Swallow who was quickly banded after it wouldn’t budge off the nest. 

                                                This month's top 10   [last week of spring's rank in brackets]

# individuals banded

mean # individuals observed daily

Tree Swallow (10)

Red-winged Blackbird (25.6) [1]

 

American Goldfinch (8.6) [2]

 

Ring-billed Gull (7.8) [-]

  

Tree Swallow (7.6) [3]

 

Yellow Warbler (6.6) [6]

 

Cliff Swallow (6.2) [-]

 

Song Sparrow (6.0) [7]

 

American Crow (5.6) [4]

 

Baltimore Oriole (5.4) [8]

 

Common Yellowthroat (5.2) [9]

The ten species most frequently observed this month were about the same as the last week of the spring season, though their order of abundance changed somewhat, and a couple of substitutions were made.  Red-winged Blackbirds continue to dominate, while American Goldfinch have increased in abundance and American Crow have slipped down to eighth place. Ring-billed Gull inched on to the list due to some large flocks being seen feeding and swirling over the fields near MBO. Overall, this list represents the most common breeding species at MBO, and is quite similar to last June.


MBO is all a-flower at the moment, providing some lovely photographic distractions.
(Photo by Marie-Anne Hudson)
 

-

 

2002- The Migration Research Foundation Inc.