McGILL BIRD OBSERVATORY

SPRING MIGRATION MONITORING PROGRAM

Week 3:  April 11 - 17, 2014

Welcome to the McGill Bird Observatory weekly report.  Click here for a complete listing of our archives.
Comments or questions are welcome at "mbo AT migrationresearch.org".

PICTURE OF THE WEEK:


Sunrise
The cold spring continues, with remnants of snow and morning frost – the rising
sun is particularly welcome on such mornings!
(Photo by Simon Duval)

 

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THIS WEEK

THIS SPRING

2014 TOTAL

SITE TOTAL

# birds (and species) banded

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46310 (113)

# birds (and species) repeat

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9134 (70)

# birds (and species) return

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1434 (38)

# species observed

44

53

62

209

# net hours

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79183.3

# birds banded / 100 net hours

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58.5

Note: table does not include nocturnal banding (owls)

Censusers:  Christine Barrie, Nicolas Bernier, Sue Bishop, Marc Boisvert, Cindy Bouchard, Marie-France Boudreault, Claude Cloutier, Luke Currin, David Davey, Jean Demers, Barbara Frei, Alison Hackney, Lisa Keelty, Marcel Lebeau, Francine Marcoux, Betsy McFarlane, Ana Morales, Benoît Piquette, Catherine Russell, Ahmad Shah, Clémence Soulard, Patricia Stotland, Elise Titman, Rodger Titman, Christiane Tremblay, Christiane Tremblay

Notes:  Although we have had some more chilly weather, migration is continuing regardless, and our daily census efforts are starting to yield results that are more typical of years past.  Among the 44 species observed this week were another dozen new arrivals for the season, featuring three of our common sparrow migrants (Swamp, White-throated, and Fox), several other early songbirds (Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hermit Thrush, Brown Thrasher, Rusty Blackbird), a couple of other site regulars (Yellow-shafted Flicker and Tree Swallow), and some less frequent visitors (Green-winged Teal, American Kestrel, and Belted Kingfisher

This week’s top 10 [last week's top 10 in brackets]  

# individuals banded

mean # individuals observed daily

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1.  Canada Goose (246)  [1]

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2.  Red-winged Blackbird (56)  [2]

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3.  Cedar Waxwing (26)  [3]

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4.  American Robin (25)  [5]

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5.  Song Sparrow (15)  [7]

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6.  Greater Snow Goose (14)  [-]

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7.  Ring-billed Gull (13)  [9]

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8.  Slate-colored Junco (9) [7]

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9.  Black-capped Chickadee (8)  [4]

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10.  Blue Jay (6)  [-]

The top three species this week lined up in the same way as last week, with the top two each increasing for a second week in a row.  In fact, the mean daily count of Red-winged Blackbirds was the highest for this time of year since 2006, when we had only slightly more (57 per day).  Similarly, the count of Canada Geese was well above average, given that in many years, the migrants are starting to taper off by this point.  Cedar Waxwing numbers dropped slightly, but are still unusually high for this time of year, with higher counts recorded only in 2005.  Perhaps similarly delayed by the late spring, American Robins moved through in good numbers, with a higher mean daily count for week 3 than ever before.  Song Sparrows also increased this year, to a typical level of abundance for mid-April.  Ring-billed Gull, Black-capped Chickadee, and Slate-colored Junco hung around the bottom half of the top ten, while Greater Snow Goose and Blue Jay were new additions, displacing American Crow and Northern Cardinal.

Golden-crownded Kinglet
The wait is nearly over - as usual, our banding program resumes at the start of week 4, and we imagine Golden-crowned Kinglets will be among the first birds in the nets.
(Photo by Simon Duval)

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2002- The Migration Research Foundation Inc.